Orbital
Distance

(a=AUs)
Orbital
Period

(P=years)
Orbital
Eccentricity

(e)
Orbital
Inclination

(i=degrees)
Mass
Estimate

(Solar)

Diameter

(Solar)

Density

(Earths)
Surface
Gravity

(Earths)

Metallicity
(Solar)
A-BC Mass Center0.0........................
Gliese 570 A1032,1300.2072.530.76-0.800.77......1.02
Inner H.Z. Edge A?0.4730.373072.53...............
Outer H.Z. Edge A?0.9301.029072.53...............
BC Mass Center872,1300.2072.53...............
Gliese 570 B0.310.8460.7651100.550.65......1.02?
Inner H.Z. Edge B?~0.20~0.120110...............
Outer H.Z. Edge B?~0.35~0.270110...............
Gliese 570 C0.480.8460.7651100.35?......1.02?
Inner H.Z. Edge C?~0.07~0.030110...............
Outer H.Z. Edge C?~0.13~0.080110...............


NOTE: This animation attempts to relate the orbits (and possible habitable zones) of Stars A, B, and C in the Gliese 570 / HR 5568 ABC system to their respective centers of mass. To enlarge the display, the orbits have been arbitrarily rotated by 45 degrees. The initial display shows the known orbital tilts of the A-BC and BC systems (at an inclination of 72.53 and 110, respectively) from the visual perspective of an observer on Earth. On the other hand, the orbital inclination of any planet that may be discovered someday in this multiple star system would likely be different from those of the habitable zone orbits depicted here. While Brown Dwarf "d" is currently observed to have separation of more than 1,500 AUs (258.3"+/-0.4" at 19.26 ly), the parameters of its orbit about the three stars has not yet been determined.

According to the new Sixth Catalog of Orbits of Visual Binaries, Star A and the close binary pair BC have a wide average separation of about 190 AUs (semi-major axis of 32.34"), moving in an eccentric orbit (e= 0.20) that lasts some 2,130 years and is inclined from the perspective of an observer on Earth at 72.53 (Alan Hale, 1994, pp. 312, 314, and 317; and Duquennoy and Mayor, 1988). The B and C pair of stars have an average separation around 0.79 AUs (semi-major axis of 0.133" at a distance of 19.26 ly) in a highly eccentric orbit (e= 0.765) lasting about 309 days with an inclination from the perspective of an observer on Earth of about 110 (Dmitri Pourbaix, 2000; and Duquennoy and Mayor, 1988).


 

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